Full Form Of DPT – What Does DPT Stands For – Abbreviations – Acronyms


Full Form of DPT: – DPT  is the combination of vaccines against three infectious diseases in humans which are diphtheria, pertussis (whooping cough) and tetanus. Components of the vaccine include diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and dead whole cells of the bacterium that causes pertussis.

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DTaP is a vaccine that helps children under the age of 7 develop immunity against three deadly diseases caused by bacteria: diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (whooping cough). Tdap is a booster shot that is administered at age 11 and offers ongoing protection against these diseases for adolescents and adults.


Full Form of DPT

Full form of DPT is Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus.

What Does DPT Stands For

DPT stands for Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus.

Abbreviation for Diphtheria, Pertussis & Tetanus

Abbreviation for Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus is DPT.

Acronym for Diphtheria, Pertussis & Tetanus

Acronym for Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus is DPT.

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Why get vaccinated?

The DTaP vaccine can help protect your child against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis.

DIPTHERIA (D) can cause respiratory problems, paralysis, and heart failure. Before vaccines, diphtheria killed tens of thousands of children each year.

THE TETANUS (T) causes a painful stretching of the muscles. It can cause the “blockage” of the jaw, so it can not open the mouth or swallow. Approximately 1 in 5 people who contract tetanus dies.

PERTUSSIS, also known as whooping cough, causes episodes of coughing so severe that it is difficult for babies and children to eat, drink or breathe. It can cause seizures, pneumonia, brain damage or death.

The majority of children vaccinated with DTaP will be protected during childhood. Many more children would have these diseases if we stopped vaccinating.

What is the difference between DTaP, Td, and Tdap?

Both vaccines contain inactivated forms of the toxin produced by the bacteria that cause all three diseases. Inactivated means that the substance no longer produces disease, but it activates the body to create antibodies that give it immunity against toxins. For children under 7 years of age, DTaP is approved. The Tdap vaccine, which has a reduced dose of diphtheria and whooping cough vaccines, is approved for adolescents 11 years of age and for adults 19 to 64 years of age that vanishes from vaccines administered at ages 4 to 6.

The capital letters in these abbreviations mean that the total strength doses of diphtheria (D) and tetanus (T), toxoids and whooping cough (P) are used in the vaccine. Lowercase “d” and “p” mean that reduced doses of diphtheria and whooping cough are used in vaccines for adolescents and adults. The “a” in DTap and Tdap means “acellular”, which means that the pertussis component contains only a part of the organism pertussis.

What is the vaccination schedule for children be vaccinated with the DTaP vaccine?

According to the following schedule, children should receive five doses of the DTaP vaccine:

  • One dose at the age of 2 months.
  • One dose at the age of 4 months.
  • One dose at the age of 6 months.
  • One dose at the age of 15 to 18 months.
  • One dose at the age of 4 to 6 years.

DTaP can be given at the same time as other vaccines. In addition, sometimes, a child can receive DTaP along with one or more vaccines at one time.

Are there children who should not receive the DTaP vaccine?

According to the recommendation by CDC, children who are moderately or severely ill at the time scheduled to receive the vaccine should wait until they recover before receiving it. However, minor illnesses, such as low or cold fever, should not prevent a child from receiving a dose of the vaccine.

If a child has a life-threatening allergic reaction after receiving a dose of the vaccine, no other dose should be given. A child who suffered a brain or nervous system illness within seven days of receiving the vaccine should not be given another dose. Some children may have a bad reaction to the whooping cough vaccine in DTaP and should not take another dose.

However, there is a vaccine called DT that will protect them from diphtheria and tetanus. Talk to your doctor if your child experienced any of the following reactions:

  • Had an attack or collapsed after a dose of DtaP
  • The baby cried non-stop for 3 hours or more after the vaccination of DtaP.
  • a fever of more than 105 F after a dose of DtaP

In some cases, your health care provider may decide to postpone your child’s DTaP vaccination for a future visit.

Risks of a vaccine reaction.

Like any medication, vaccines can have side effects. But the risk of experiencing a serious problem for DTaP or Tdap is extremely small. On the other hand, the risk of your child contracting a serious illness such as diphtheria or whooping cough is extremely high without the vaccine.

Redness, pain, swelling, and tenderness at the injection site are common after DTaP. Fever, irritability, tiredness, lack of appetite and vomiting sometimes occur 1 to 3 days after DTaP vaccination.

More serious reactions, such as seizures, crying without interruption for 3 hours or more, or high fever (more than 105 ° F) after vaccination with DTaP occur much less frequently. Rarely, the vaccine is followed by inflammation of the entire arm or leg, especially in older children when they receive their fourth or fifth dose.

Long-term seizures, coma, decreased consciousness or permanent brain damage occur very rarely after vaccination with DTaP. As with any medication, there is a very remote possibility that a vaccine will cause a severe allergic reaction, other serious injury or death.

What happens if there is a serious problem?

An allergic reaction may occur after the child leaves the clinic. If you notice signs of a severe allergic reaction (hives, swelling of the face and throat, shortness of breath, fast heartbeat, dizziness or weakness), call 9-1-1 and take the child to the nearest hospital.

What can you do to reduce fever and pain after your child’s vaccination?

Give your child an analgesic without aspirin, such as paracetamol (uh-c-tuh-min-uh-end). This is especially important if your child has ever had a seizure. It is also very important if a father, brother or sister has ever had a seizure.

Ask your child’s doctor how much pain reliever you can give your child and how often. Call your child’s doctor if your child is crying non-stop. Call 911 or 0 (operator) to obtain an ambulance to reach the nearest hospital or clinic if your child has any of the following important problems.

Fever of 105 ° F (40.6 ° C) or more, Less alert, lazy and pale, Seizure.

Tell emergency doctors what happened, the date and time it happened, and when your child was vaccinated.

Vaccine-induced polyneuropathy

The vaccine against diphtheria, whooping cough, and tetanus rarely cause segmental demyelination and axonal neuropathy from the tetanus toxoid component. Although it is very rare, symmetric demyelinating neuropathy, when it occurs, responds to immunomodulatory therapy. A rare transient post-vaccination polyneuropathy with complete recovery has been reported.

Who can easily get infected?

  • Children over 6 months
  • Pregnant women
  • People 50 years of age and older.
  • People of any age with certain chronic medical conditions, such as chronic diseases of the lungs, heart, liver or kidneys. blood disorders; and diabetes mellitus
  • People living in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities
  • People who live with or care for people at high risk of complications from influenza
  • Health workers
  • Household contacts of people at high risk of complications from influenza

Household contacts and caregivers outside the home for children under 6 months of age. Vaccination against hepatitis B has been associated with neuropathy in the case reports of adults. Acute sensory neuropathy has been reported in a 13-year-old boy after vaccination with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG).

Why get vaccinated?

The DTaP vaccine can help protect your child against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis. DIFERIA (D) can cause respiratory problems, paralysis, and heart failure. Before vaccines, diphtheria killed tens of thousands of children each year in the United States.

THE TETANUS (T) causes a painful stretching of the muscles. It can cause the “blockage” of the jaw, so it cannot open the mouth or swallow. Approximately 1 in 5 people who contract tetanus dies. PERTUSSIS (aP), also known as whooping cough, causes episodes of coughing so severe that it is difficult for babies and children to eat, drink or breathe.

The majority of children vaccinated with DTaP will be protected during childhood. Many more children would have these diseases if we stopped vaccinating.

Some children should not receive the DTaP vaccine or should wait

DTaP is only for children under 7 years old. The DTaP vaccine is not suitable for everyone: a small number of children should receive a different vaccine containing only diphtheria and tetanus instead of DTaP.

Tell your health care provider if your child:

  • Have had an allergic reaction after a previous dose of DTaP, or have severe allergies that are life-threatening.
  • Have had a coma or repeated seizures for 7 days after a dose of DTaP.
  • Have seizures or other nervous system problems.
  • You have had a condition called Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS).
  • You have had severe pain or swelling after a previous dose of DTaP or DT vaccine. In some cases, your health care provider may decide to postpone your child’s DTaP vaccination for a future visit.

Children with minor illnesses, such as a cold, can be vaccinated. Children who are moderately or severely ill should generally wait until they recover before receiving the DTaP vaccine.

What happens if there is a serious problem?

An allergic reaction may occur after the child leaves the clinic. If you notice signs of a severe allergic reaction (hives, swelling of the face and throat, shortness of breath, fast heartbeat, dizziness or weakness), take the child to the nearest hospital.

Should pregnant women receive a Tdap vaccine?

Yes, all pregnant women should receive a Tdap injection in the third trimester, preferably between 27 weeks and 36 weeks of pregnancy. The Tdap vaccine is an effective and safe way to protect you and your baby from serious diseases and complications of whooping cough. Pregnant women should receive a Tdap injection during each pregnancy.

In what quarter is it safe to receive a Tdap vaccine?

It is safe to receive the Tdap vaccine during the three trimesters of pregnancy. Experts recommend that you receive Tdap during the third trimester (preferably between 27 weeks and 36 weeks of pregnancy). This gives newborns the greatest protection. The injection causes you to produce antibodies against whooping cough. These antibiotics are passed on to the fetus. Protect your newborn until he or she begins receiving pertussis vaccines at 2 months of age.

Can newborns be vaccinated against whooping cough?

No. Newborns cannot start their series of pertussis vaccines until they are 2 months old because the vaccine does not work in the first weeks of life. This is partly because newborns are at increased risk of getting whooping cough and getting very sick.

What else can I do to protect my baby against whooping cough?

Getting your Tdap vaccine is the most important step to protect yourself and your baby against whooping cough. It is also important that all family members and caregivers are up to date on their immunizations. If you need the Tdap vaccine, you should receive it at least 2 weeks before you have contact with your new bronchus. This creates a “cocoon” of safety for the vaccinated caregivers around their body.

Pregnant women did not receive my Tdap vaccine during pregnancy. Do you still need to receive the vaccine?

If you have never received the Tdap vaccine and you do not get the vaccine during pregnancy. Be sure to get the vaccine immediately after you give birth before you leave the hospital or maternity center.

Your body will take approximately 2 weeks to produce protective antibodies in response to the vaccine. Once these antibodies are produced, you will be less likely to give pertussis to newborns. But, the baby will still be at risk of getting other whooping coughs.

If pregnant women received a Tdap vaccine during pregnancy, should they be vaccinated again during this pregnancy?

Yes. All pregnant women should receive a Tdap vaccine during each pregnancy, preferably between 27 weeks and 36 weeks of pregnancy. This time frame is recommended because it provides the greatest protection to the pregnant woman and the fetus. It seems to maximize the antibodies present in the newborn at birth.

If pregnant women received a Tdap vaccine at the beginning of this pregnancy, before 27-36 weeks of pregnancy, should they receive another Tdap vaccine between 27 weeks and 36 weeks of pregnancy?

A pregnant woman does not need to receive the Tdap vaccine later in the same pregnancy if it was applied in the first or second trimester.

Can we get the Tdap vaccine and the flu vaccine at the same time?

Yes. You can receive more than one vaccine on the same visit.

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